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An East Coast Wine Maven Brings Her Style to the West Coast

An East Coast Wine Maven Brings Her Style to the West Coast


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Whenever I'm dining out in New York City, I always order a glass of Wölffer Estate's Rosé and/or my absolute favorite, the No. It's very common to find in NYC restaurants and bars. I've always wanted it to come over to the West Coast, though.

If we can't sip on a glass of Wölffer Estate Rosé in LA, we can at least dress like we do! Although Californians still can't purchase Wölffer Estate wines in our own state, we do have the opportunity to shop for new clothes at co-owner Joey Wölffer's pop-up, The Road We Travel at Platform LA, where Joey curates a Hamptons-meets-boho collection from an array of her favorite luxe designers.

I had a moment to chat with Joey about this now-open pop-up and the future of rosé.

The Daily Meal: How will this pop-up be different from your Sag Harbor and Nantucket locations?
Joey Wölffer
: My aesthetic is always the same. But LA is sophisticated and glamorous, so for this pop-up, I added a little sparkle to my boho look. I haven't been able to showcase here, so I'm very excited for that. When Platform reached out to me, I thought to be amongst these other brands is so great.

It's the perfect opportunity to get your brand out among LA locals! Any spots you're excited to check out while you're in LA?
Pasadena flea market, for sure, and Sugarfish by Sushi Nozawa.

How hectic is it trying to juggle the wine business, clothing retail, and a child?
I wouldn't be as productive as I am if I didn't do it all. I love keeping busy, but I can admit, I feel too stretched out sometimes. I'm lucky to have a good team. In fact, this is a pop-up location only, so I can do multiple things.

Rosé has grown in popularity so much over the past decade. How does Wölffer Estate separate themselves from the other vineyards?
We don't want to be a trend. We want to be around forever. We produced our first rosé back in 1995. When we did a Provence-style rosé, people thought we were crazy. And look at the popularity of our rosé now! Our goal is to serve quality wines and for guests to enjoy the vineyard.

Were you there when Real Housewives of New York showed up to the Wölffer Estate? And, who’s your favorite Housewife?
I wasn't, but they're great! I've known Luann [de Lesseps] for a few years; she's a friend to my dad. So I have to pick her! It's nice [Bravo] supports us so much. There was no drama, luckily; the ladies were well behaved in this scene.

Any advice for women pursuing jobs in the creative field?
I encourage anyone going into the creative field to make sure you learn at a bigger level. Make mistakes and have some experience before you go out on your own. It's also very important to make sure your product is authentic and original.

Check out Joey Wölffer's The Road We Travel at Platform LA at 8830 Washington Blvd. in Culver City. Be sure to follow her Instagram page here.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


The Crab Bowl: Baltimore and San Francisco Square Off in a Battle of Recipes

Super Bowl XLVII brings two crab-mad towns, Baltimore and San Francisco, together in yet another shellfish-obsessed city, New Orleans. In an American major sport championship first, the opposing teams are coached by brothers, Jim Harbaugh of the 49ers and John Harbaugh of the Ravens. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast, brother vs. brother and, when it comes to signature cuisines, Dungeness crabs vs. Chesapeake blues.

This year, Wine Spectator's Super Bowl food-and-wine pairing match-up features recipes for two crab-based specialties, Faidley’s Famous Crab Cakes from Baltimore and Rose Pistola’s Cioppino from San Francisco.

“Bawlmer” crab cakes have proliferated there since the 19th century, when J.W. Faidley Seafood, the Chesapeake Bay area's most revered purveyor of crab patties, first opened its doors. Founded in 1886, Faidley's is owned and operated today by Bill and Nancy Devine. (Nancy is a third-generation descendant of founder John W. Faidley, Sr.) Nancy herself oversees the hand-making of the Lexington Market restaurant's famed lump blue crab cakes. She and her daughter, Damye Hahn, provided us with a simple version of the Faidley's Famous Crab Cake, minus a few secret ingredients. If you want the real thing, they ship fresh crab cakes overnight to anywhere in the United States.

Fresh lump crabmeat—slightly sweet, slightly briny and always delicate—pairs well with a wide range of white wines, from Albariño to Vermentino, as well as sparkling wines and dry rosés. "We generally suggest a nice Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc," said Hahn. "The David Hill Estate Reserve Chardonnay from Oregon is a good choice, as is Domaine Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc from Touraine. My personal go-to everyday pairing is a blend from Côtes de Gascogne called Haut-Marin. It's a great seafood wine."

Faidley's crab cakes are perfect for party snacking and pair well with an array of adult beverages.

In its pan-fried cake form, crab pairs well with beer, of course. Hahn reports that the customers at Faidley's are particularly fond of washing down their crab cakes with cans of "Natty Boh," the local pilsner. National Bohemian brewed its first lager just a year before Faidley Seafood opened and was the first brewery to package beer in the now-ubiquitous six-pack. Locals are known to make a "Baltimore Margarita" by rimming a chilled beer mug of Natty Boh with Old Bay seasoning. The Raven, another popular local brew, seems particularly well-suited for Super Bowl Sunday. "I personally like a nice hefeweizen, with citrus, of course," said Hahn.

San Francisco has an obsession with its own local crustacean, the Dungeness crab, and a dish that originated here in the 19th century, cioppino, a Mediterranean-style fish-and-crab stew made with white wine. Fisherman immigrants from Portugal and Italy would make cioppino from the chopped-up leftovers of the day's catch, the dish's name likely derived from the Genoan dialect Italian verb ciuppin, or "to chop."

One of the best bowls of cioppino in San Francisco can be found at Rose Pistola, a Ligurian-influenced restaurant that opened in 1996 in the Italian neighborhood of North Beach. Executive chef Mark Gordon, who also oversees the kitchens at sister restaurants Terzo and Rose's Café, offers his recipe for Rose Pistola's Cioppino.

Rose Pistola's cioppino is a favorite among Bay-area crab aficionados.

Many San Francisco cioppinos are more tomato-based, but Rose Pistola's version is closer to a seafood soup, with tomato as one of the flavor components. Gordon recommends using a dry, crisp, high-acid white wine for cooking—Sauvignon Blanc or Albariño—though he suggests richer whites and even reds with good acidity for pairing with the final product. "This soup is pretty rich, with a little bit of tomato and acid, but also a little bit of spice to it," said Gordon, who previously worked as a chef at Fetzer Vineyards. “There are a lot of [wines] that could work with it really, really well.”

Gordon's picks ranged from Spanish cava to a Saumur rosé from France's Loire Valley to whites such as Vermentino, Verdicchio or Pinot Blanc that have good minerality, good acid and a little bit of richness. "But I think red makes a more interesting pairing," he said. "Pinot Noir, you want one that's not too rich and jammy, you want one that's high in acidity. The same thing with Zinfandel. We have Storybook [Mountain] Zin at Rose Pistola and I think that's a perfect combination. Barolo with a little bit of age—not one that's just been released but maybe a 5-year-old Barolo," said Gordon. "Cru Beaujolais would be great. And Barbera I think works great with that tomato, but only one that was made in stainless steel—I wouldn't recommend one that had any oak treatment."

For plenty of other Super Bowl party recipes (from wings to chowders to Roethlisburgers), check out all the links in the sidebar.

Baltimore vs. San Francisco Super Bowl Party Recipes

Note: The following list is a selection of outstanding and very good wines from recently rated releases. More value wines can be found in our Wine Ratings Search.


Watch the video: BostonTalks: Forcasting Food (July 2022).


Comments:

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  3. Scot

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