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Baked Yucca Fries

Baked Yucca Fries



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A few years back, the sweet potato revolutionized the way we eat fries. This Latin America treat has the same consistency as a potato.MORE+LESS-

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  • 1

    Preheat oven to 450° F .

  • 2

    Fully peel and rinse the Yucca. Cut in half (this bad boy is on the more difficult side to slice). Once cut in half, slice the stem that's going along the groove out of the vegetable. Then, chop into small spears.

  • 3

    Place chopped Yucca on a cookie sheet and splash olive oil and the remaining ingredients. Cook for around 10-15 minutes or until golden brown.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • If you’re new to yucca, this starchy South American root vegetable will quickly become a favorite. Similar in texture to a potato, this root can be boiled, chopped up, mashed, fried, baked and most importantly, turned into fries. Baked yucca fries are the snack or side you’ll want on every dinner, game day and party menu. Baking it ensures the fries are golden brown and crispy on the outside without becoming too greasy. They taste great with ketchup or garlic aioli, and even plain with a little salt. And if you’re looking for more veggie-friendly dishes check out our vegetable recipes for all your meal, snack and appetizer needs.

Recipe Summary

Peel most of the yuca, trimming off the tough end. Cut yuca in thirds. Stand each section on its end and carefully cut lengthwise into quarters.

Place yuca in a saucepan of cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat reduce heat to medium and simmer until just barely tender, 5 to 6 minutes. Drain yuca on a paper towel-lined plate. Let cool to room temperature.

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add yuca and fry until golden brown and crispy, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and let rest for a few minutes before serving.


HOW TO MAKE YUCA FRIES

The yuca root varies in size but is generally long and narrow with tough brown skin and dense, creamy white flesh, a little similar in texture to celeriac and yams. It has a very mild flavour and is quite starchy in texture when cooked. It’s drier than a white or sweet potato, or other root vegetables, so it likes to be served with wet condiments and sauces.

Make sure to peel away the brown skin. Simply slice the root into thick chips and toss with some olive oil and spices. I love roasting or baking yuca fries as it’s much healthier and cleaner than deep-frying. They will take about 25 minutes at 200 C/400 F.

PS. Yuca root, or cassava, can be purchased from quality greengrocers or from Asian, African or South American produce focused stores.


Perfectly Baked Yuca Fries

I stumbled onto this recently when I visited a Venezuelan restaurant with my wife. She was adventurous enough to order the yuca fries (for the first time), and we were both blown away and surprised by how amazing they were. Needless to say, I ate most of her fries and abandoned my regular ones.

So I decided to make my own at home, thanks to the instructions provided by one awesome restaurant owner.

The spongy fry chronicles :

What the deal with soggy fries ? You go a fast food joint and they are just like : Do you want some fries with that ? Of course, I say yes (Fries, duh !). And the moment I take that first bite, I start questioning my decision-making process. So dry and spongy, you might as well call them tampons.

I swore off all spongy fries and started making my own and let me tell you this, it was worth it. There are so many options out there and the moment you make them by yourself it’s no longer a choice. You will always go for homemade.

What the heck is Yuca ? Yu-cka ? Yooka ?

Yuca is a root vegetable that is widely used in South American cuisine. In fact, it’s such a staple that it is the third largest source of carbohydrates eaten in South America, after rice and corn, of course. While it isn’t yet a staple in North-America, it’s slowly making it’s way onto our tables and restaurants, thanks to the different waves of immigration coming from the south.

Take a look, don’t be scared.

The crispiest fries ever :

Now, this is what you get with yuca fries: crispiness! Guaranteed crispiness. How rare is that with home-made fries? Absolutely no need to stress about how to cut your fries, or what size they are. They will be so crispy and feathery that it will blow you away. They have this surprising flakiness that you simply will not get from potatoes: as you can see on the above pictures, and they have this element of subtle sweetness that just takes it up a notch. Wait… Have I also mentioned that they are incredibly easy to make?

I know what you think: “There is no way this is better than potatoes, Yuca-to be kidding Idriss …”

I’m not, they are awesome, just take a look :

That being said, we should probably cover some important points before we unveil today’s recipe.

Are Yuca Fries Gluten-free?

Are Yuca Fries low in carbs?

Let me answer this one using my new found Canadian accent. Noooooooooooo way man. Heck no. Yuca contains a whole lot more carbs per 100g than a potato does (38g vs 17g). So if you’re trying to have a little keto friendly snake, stay away from these.

Are Yuca Fries Healthy?

Well, it all depends on how much you eat of them. If you eat buckets of Yuca Fries (especially deep fried), then no. They are as healthy as baked potato fries can be. Rich in potassium and vitamin C but still a treat that you should enjoy in moderation.

What do Yuca Fries taste like?

That’s a tricky one to answer, however, I will do my best. They taste sweeter than a regular french fry, but not a sweet as sweet potato fries. The thing that you will notice the most when you try yuca fries for the first time, is the texture. If you look at the picture above, you will notice that they are very flaky. That flakiness makes them super crispy and very different from anything you have ever had before.

How to cook Yuca Fries?

There are 2 ways to cook Yuca Fries. You can either deep fry them or bake them. Either way, you are going to have to boil your fries first before bake/fry them.

But don’t take my word for it, make them, enjoy them and share with me your opinions! If you are looking for more french fries recipes, check these out!

If you like what we do, please subscribe to our newsletter, you will get a free eBook with our Top 10 money saving tips and some extra recipes that are only available to our subscribers.


Baked Crispy Cassava Fries (Yuca Fries)

Baked Crispy Cassava Fries (Yuca Fries) – crunchy, slightly sweet baked cassava fries that makes a great healthy alternative to the usual French fries. Simply guilt-free snacks!

Are you tried of eating French fries? Do you need a healthy alternative? Why not try Cassava fries? They are crunchy, slightly sweet, baked and I must say – very tasty. Back home, in Cameroon, we rarely cooked cassava aka yuca . I would occasionally enjoy this starchy root vegetable from neighbors and friends. I often wonder why it was not part of our go-to side dish like plantains, yams, or rice….. It is affordable, sold in most market and a staple food in Africa. I am guessing it was about preference. It seems my family ( the older folks) did not particularly care for it.

For the younger generation however,….. it was a different story. We would often exchange food items with neighbors and our first choice for the exchange would be the “exiled” cassava. Next, we would roast it over a three stone cooking fire outside and devour it with salt and palm oil. Then when our parents would show up we would act like nothing happened.

If you are clueless as to what cassava is? It is a tuberous starchy root grown in most tropical countries especially in Africa. Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava. This root requires very little water to grow. Here in America it is readily available in most Latin stores and even in the major supermarkets.

Here is a simple and healthy way to enjoy cassava. Peel and cut the cassava, then boil it with salt and sugar until almost tender. Place on baking sheet aligned foil or parchment paper , drizzle with oil, throw in some garlic, parsley and bake. The added oil produces crisp cassava fries.


Yucca Fries & Roast Garlic Aioli

Yucca Fries-Light and crisp, fresh Yucca fries (Baked or fried) with an Aromatic Roast Garlic Dipping Sauce. Savory, sweet and so healthy and delicious.

I know you might have come across this funny looking brown tuber root in the supermarket and wander what the heck do you do with it. Well, wander no more. This is a great way to try it out and it tastes delicious both ways – Fried or Baked. With this Garlic Aioli you are going to be super happy and want to put the sauce on EVERYTHING.

If you are clueless as to what Yucca(cassava) is? It is a tuberous starchy root grown -enjoyed in most tropical regions, South America, Caribbean and especially in Africa. Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava.

It is enjoyed in any shape or form- boiled, stewed, fried , baked , roasted , mashed … and the list goes on.

In my household, we eat a lot of cassava because the two men in my life REALLY like it.

What’s a girl do but to give them what they want. They prefer it to any other starchy root vegetables. I have been cooking this up a lot recently so I couldn’t help but share another recipe with roasted garlic sauce. An appetizer that is often present in Latin Caribbean restaurants.

When I see fresh-looking ones I go crazy in the supermarket and stock up. Clean, peel the outer exterior, remove the ugly fibrous root in the middle and freeze. That way I can keep them satiated even when am not in any mood to cook.

You know they are also available frozen at Ethnic markets and even in some supermarkets depending on your location. So you can still enjoy cassava without the peeling, that’s is if you do not want to mess your pretty fingers.

This is a quick and easy way of making this yucca. I had it in a Cuban restaurant with garlic aioli and it was Soooo delish!


Recipe Summary

Peel most of the yuca, trimming off the tough end. Cut yuca in thirds. Stand each section on its end and carefully cut lengthwise into quarters.

Place yuca in a saucepan of cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat reduce heat to medium and simmer until just barely tender, 5 to 6 minutes. Drain yuca on a paper towel-lined plate. Let cool to room temperature.

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add yuca and fry until golden brown and crispy, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and let rest for a few minutes before serving.


HOW TO MAKE YUCA FRIES

The yuca root varies in size but is generally long and narrow with tough brown skin and dense, creamy white flesh, a little similar in texture to celeriac and yams. It has a very mild flavour and is quite starchy in texture when cooked. It’s drier than a white or sweet potato, or other root vegetables, so it likes to be served with wet condiments and sauces.

Make sure to peel away the brown skin. Simply slice the root into thick chips and toss with some olive oil and spices. I love roasting or baking yuca fries as it’s much healthier and cleaner than deep-frying. They will take about 25 minutes at 200 C/400 F.

PS. Yuca root, or cassava, can be purchased from quality greengrocers or from Asian, African or South American produce focused stores.


Perfectly Baked Yuca Fries

I stumbled onto this recently when I visited a Venezuelan restaurant with my wife. She was adventurous enough to order the yuca fries (for the first time), and we were both blown away and surprised by how amazing they were. Needless to say, I ate most of her fries and abandoned my regular ones.

So I decided to make my own at home, thanks to the instructions provided by one awesome restaurant owner.

The spongy fry chronicles :

What the deal with soggy fries ? You go a fast food joint and they are just like : Do you want some fries with that ? Of course, I say yes (Fries, duh !). And the moment I take that first bite, I start questioning my decision-making process. So dry and spongy, you might as well call them tampons.

I swore off all spongy fries and started making my own and let me tell you this, it was worth it. There are so many options out there and the moment you make them by yourself it’s no longer a choice. You will always go for homemade.

What the heck is Yuca ? Yu-cka ? Yooka ?

Yuca is a root vegetable that is widely used in South American cuisine. In fact, it’s such a staple that it is the third largest source of carbohydrates eaten in South America, after rice and corn, of course. While it isn’t yet a staple in North-America, it’s slowly making it’s way onto our tables and restaurants, thanks to the different waves of immigration coming from the south.

Take a look, don’t be scared.

The crispiest fries ever :

Now, this is what you get with yuca fries: crispiness! Guaranteed crispiness. How rare is that with home-made fries? Absolutely no need to stress about how to cut your fries, or what size they are. They will be so crispy and feathery that it will blow you away. They have this surprising flakiness that you simply will not get from potatoes: as you can see on the above pictures, and they have this element of subtle sweetness that just takes it up a notch. Wait… Have I also mentioned that they are incredibly easy to make?

I know what you think: “There is no way this is better than potatoes, Yuca-to be kidding Idriss …”

I’m not, they are awesome, just take a look :

That being said, we should probably cover some important points before we unveil today’s recipe.

Are Yuca Fries Gluten-free?

Are Yuca Fries low in carbs?

Let me answer this one using my new found Canadian accent. Noooooooooooo way man. Heck no. Yuca contains a whole lot more carbs per 100g than a potato does (38g vs 17g). So if you’re trying to have a little keto friendly snake, stay away from these.

Are Yuca Fries Healthy?

Well, it all depends on how much you eat of them. If you eat buckets of Yuca Fries (especially deep fried), then no. They are as healthy as baked potato fries can be. Rich in potassium and vitamin C but still a treat that you should enjoy in moderation.

What do Yuca Fries taste like?

That’s a tricky one to answer, however, I will do my best. They taste sweeter than a regular french fry, but not a sweet as sweet potato fries. The thing that you will notice the most when you try yuca fries for the first time, is the texture. If you look at the picture above, you will notice that they are very flaky. That flakiness makes them super crispy and very different from anything you have ever had before.

How to cook Yuca Fries?

There are 2 ways to cook Yuca Fries. You can either deep fry them or bake them. Either way, you are going to have to boil your fries first before bake/fry them.

But don’t take my word for it, make them, enjoy them and share with me your opinions! If you are looking for more french fries recipes, check these out!

If you like what we do, please subscribe to our newsletter, you will get a free eBook with our Top 10 money saving tips and some extra recipes that are only available to our subscribers.


Baked Crispy Cassava Fries (Yuca Fries)

Baked Crispy Cassava Fries (Yuca Fries) – crunchy, slightly sweet baked cassava fries that makes a great healthy alternative to the usual French fries. Simply guilt-free snacks!

Are you tried of eating French fries? Do you need a healthy alternative? Why not try Cassava fries? They are crunchy, slightly sweet, baked and I must say – very tasty. Back home, in Cameroon, we rarely cooked cassava aka yuca . I would occasionally enjoy this starchy root vegetable from neighbors and friends. I often wonder why it was not part of our go-to side dish like plantains, yams, or rice….. It is affordable, sold in most market and a staple food in Africa. I am guessing it was about preference. It seems my family ( the older folks) did not particularly care for it.

For the younger generation however,….. it was a different story. We would often exchange food items with neighbors and our first choice for the exchange would be the “exiled” cassava. Next, we would roast it over a three stone cooking fire outside and devour it with salt and palm oil. Then when our parents would show up we would act like nothing happened.

If you are clueless as to what cassava is? It is a tuberous starchy root grown in most tropical countries especially in Africa. Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava. This root requires very little water to grow. Here in America it is readily available in most Latin stores and even in the major supermarkets.

Here is a simple and healthy way to enjoy cassava. Peel and cut the cassava, then boil it with salt and sugar until almost tender. Place on baking sheet aligned foil or parchment paper , drizzle with oil, throw in some garlic, parsley and bake. The added oil produces crisp cassava fries.


Yucca Fries & Roast Garlic Aioli

Yucca Fries-Light and crisp, fresh Yucca fries (Baked or fried) with an Aromatic Roast Garlic Dipping Sauce. Savory, sweet and so healthy and delicious.

I know you might have come across this funny looking brown tuber root in the supermarket and wander what the heck do you do with it. Well, wander no more. This is a great way to try it out and it tastes delicious both ways – Fried or Baked. With this Garlic Aioli you are going to be super happy and want to put the sauce on EVERYTHING.

If you are clueless as to what Yucca(cassava) is? It is a tuberous starchy root grown -enjoyed in most tropical regions, South America, Caribbean and especially in Africa. Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava.

It is enjoyed in any shape or form- boiled, stewed, fried , baked , roasted , mashed … and the list goes on.

In my household, we eat a lot of cassava because the two men in my life REALLY like it.

What’s a girl do but to give them what they want. They prefer it to any other starchy root vegetables. I have been cooking this up a lot recently so I couldn’t help but share another recipe with roasted garlic sauce. An appetizer that is often present in Latin Caribbean restaurants.

When I see fresh-looking ones I go crazy in the supermarket and stock up. Clean, peel the outer exterior, remove the ugly fibrous root in the middle and freeze. That way I can keep them satiated even when am not in any mood to cook.

You know they are also available frozen at Ethnic markets and even in some supermarkets depending on your location. So you can still enjoy cassava without the peeling, that’s is if you do not want to mess your pretty fingers.

This is a quick and easy way of making this yucca. I had it in a Cuban restaurant with garlic aioli and it was Soooo delish!


Watch the video: How to grow Yucca plants from cuttings (August 2022).